GWTChosen 3.0 and an upcoming Q&A on this release

Erratum on the event date: It will be held on October the 7th with Maxime and Olivier from Arcbees on this release

We’re happy to announce the latest major update of GWTChosen – version 3.0.

This release includes a mobile version of GWTChosen. The full release notes on GitHub describe it in detail. The whole purpose of GWTChosen has been to make long, unwieldy select boxes user-friendly. However, the mobile experience still wasn’t smooth enough, so we refactored the code. Now mobile users can enjoy the same ease of use that GWTChosen gave people on larger screens.

If we compare the desktop and the mobile version of Chosen, we see that each one is a good fit for its context of use.

Single Chosen on desktop :

single-desktop

Single Chosen on mobile

single-mobile

Multiple Chosen on desktop

multiple-desktop

Multiple Chosen on mobile

multiple-mobile

If you’re not sure how to include GWTChosen in your project, check out the documentation. We made it as easy to include as we possibly could (hint : it’s a one-liner ;-)).

As Philippe said in his last blog post, we will start a series of Q&A sessions with leading lights in the GWT Universe. First up will be on the release of GWT Chosen. It will be held next week for a live Q&A on October 7th! You can already register for the event here.

Subscribe to our newsletter to receive more articles of this type in your inbox. Stay tuned for a follow-up article on how to use the GWTChosen custom styling properties.

Open letter to our community

Hello friend,

This letter is going out to everyone in our network, but especially to you in our open source development community. Many of you have been involved with us since the very beginning, when Philippe and I were working on GWTP as part of puzzlebazar. As we became Arcbees and continued to develop tools and best practices for ourselves, we have continued to share and develop them with you. We are proud of what this community has accomplished, and we are grateful for everything we have learned from you in the process.

We are enjoying our business adventure so far, and wish to do even more in the future. Our open source initiatives have always been our top priority, but we do face a challenge faced by many other open source startups. We need to move from a service business to a product business and we want to dedicate a team to work on our open source projects, to improve our tools faster, offer commercial clients the best support experience and continue our involvement with our community.



This is why I want to reach out to ask for your help! We’ve put together a brief survey asking critical questions that we hope will help us improve our support offering. I also welcome you to contact me directly if you want to share feedback without feeling constrained by the survey. I’d be very happy to speak with anybody who has ideas they want to share with me!

Please fill out the survey and/or contact me directly.

Thank you for your help!


GAE-Studio is now open source!

Some of you may already have noticed or heard me saying that GAE-Studio was going to be open sourced and I think it is past overdue to officially announce it: GAE-Studio is now open source under Apache 2 and freely available! We promise to keep working on it, and to make that possible, we’re going to add GAE-Studio support to our open source support packages. You can find the source code under our Arcbees github organization as well as on maven central. We released an official, stable version 1.0 a couple of days ago that you can see in action on our demo website. You can also read our documentation to learn more about how to install GAE-Studio in your Google App Engine application.

Some may wonder why we chose to open source what was going to be our first official product. We’ve first started this venture almost 3 years ago when Arcbees was still in its inception. We were using Google App Engine heavily, and the lack of a good datastore admin console was a big problem. At the time, Google App Engine didn’t have any hooks on which we could build one, so we hacked our way around and built something useful for our own work. One year later, after finding other users were feeling the same pain as we did using Google App Engine, we set out to improve GAE-Studio user experience. It was planned to be our very first product that wasn’t going to be open sourced.

Last summer, Google IO announced a new console for Google App Engine that removed much of the pain that GAE-Studio was designed to help with. Then some time later, Objectify-Insight came out, and our visualization engine would be in competition with it. Since we love and have been using Objectify for years, we didn’t want to become their commercial competitor.

Still, we were and are hopeful that GAE-Studio will be useful for our developers. For one thing, GAE-Studio is available to all environments using the Modules, although it was initially written for the Java runtime. This is because Google now provides hooks in the Google App Engine SDK for the things we had to hack our way around to in the past. The further advantage of GAE-Studio is that it can be used locally! While Google has improved the usability of their cloud console a lot, the usability of local development tools is still weak.
Several hundred users have expressed an interest in using GAE-Studio, and we are now ready to officially release it in their hands. We hope you will find GAE-Studio useful, and will help us support the remaining runtime.

Thanks for the support and words of encouragement, and thanks for sticking with us through this venture!

About GAE-Studio

GAE Studio helps you optimize applications hosted on Google App Engine.

GAE Studio also allows datastore exploration, modification, deletion, import and export. Think of it as your swiss army knife for developing GAE applications!

Using real-time analysis of datastore requests, GAE Studio quickly highlights inefficient queries and gathers metrics that will help developers improve application performance.

15

GWT.create 2015: Top 5 sessions

Following my last week post about my experience at GWT.create 2015, I would have chosen more than 5 sessions to talk about, but I had to cut this short if I wanted to keep my readers 😀 Here’s my top 5:

  1. New brand and documentation
  2. Singular
  3. JsInterop
  4. GSS
  5. Incremental compile in SDM

New Brand and new website

I didn’t list this one first simply because Arcbees’ own Manon Gruaz did the design, but more because the GWT brand looked a lot like an old guy in a disco – possibly cool inside but not really looking that cool to onlookers. The centrality of Java alone feels dated for some people. The logo was definitely dated and a due for a makeover, and the documentation was starting to look like a 1990’s style early website. A full reboot of the brand was needed, something fresh that would communicate how much we care about architecture, how we work together as a community and the simplicity we seek while nevertheless building large, maintainable enterprise web applications.

While there’s still work to do on the documentation itself, the new branding was designed to be extensible, and is ready to be used seamlessly across the GWT community. I invite you to take a look at the GWT Brand book to learn more about the GWT brand and logo.

Singular

This session by Daniel Kurka was one of my favorites at GWT.Create for several reasons. While simplifying the development process considerably using the same patterns as Angular, something even more powerful lurks behind the scenes. It lets you build true multiplatform applications (Android, iOS, web). Singular uses techniques developed for Inbox that let you compile java code to Objective-C thanks to J2ObjC and to javascript thanks to GWT. So that more than 80% of you code can be shared between the three platforms. To know more, I invite you to watch j2objc’s session by Tom Ball: J2ObjC: Sharing Java Code with iOS Applications.

Angular has performance problems when it comes to really large web applications. As you know, Angular scans the DOM for directives at runtime. Singular, thanks to GWT, does that at compile time, improving performance by a lot.

The project is still in its infancy, but what Daniel did already demonstrates that writing Java can be as simple as writing Javascript while preserving Type Safety. To know more, I invite you to watch Daniel Kurka’s session: Singular – Reimagining AngularJS in Java.

JsInterop

Writing wrappers has always been a pain in the ass and while using an external javascript library is possible, it is truly tedious; to the point where I have seen some business dropping GWT because they couldn’t easily use some of their favorite Javascript libraries. This won’t be a problem anymore. You can already turn on JsInterop in GWT 2.7 as an early release, but you’ll really get everything you need to start hacking around a Javascript library in GWT 2.8. In case you have any doubts, I invite you to take a look at Ray Cromwell’s session: Deep dive in JsInterop.

GSS

If you have a web development background and have done a bit of CSS, you know how painful it can be to work with CssResources; not because it was poorly designed, but mostly because some fundamental CSS3 features weren’t even available! To keep up the with the pace of this ever-changing world, GSS has been added to GWT. GSS brings full CSS3 support and several interesting features like mixins, conditionals, variables and more. It’s now easier to write and maintain the CSS files of your GWT application.

Thanks to Julien Dramaix, this is one of the few major outside contributions made to GWT since the steering committee was created, and we’re proud to have participated in this. To learn more about GSS, I invite you to take a look at Julien Dramaix’s session: CSS3 and GWT in perfect harmony.

Incremental compile in SDM

Last,but not least, incremental compilation now lets us seamlessly refresh our work in the browser in day to day development activities, and get the latest code from our IDE in less than 2 seconds. Before, it was a real pain to use SDM because it would do a full recompile of the whole application each time you needed to see a new change. Thanks to incremental compilation, that is not the case anymore.

IDE support in both Eclipse and IntelliJ is still in active development. We can already use our favorite debugger, but in some cases, it will not work. For now, we’re still stuck debugging in my Chrome console, and thanks to source map, we can see quickly where problems are. I’m still eager to go back to my IDE, put my breakpoints in and get my usual workflows in place, and I’m pretty sure that I will see that happen really soon! To learn more, I invite you to take a look at John Stalcup’s session: Incremental compilation.

Conclusion

In conclusion, GWT.Create was a blast this year! I had fun, met great developers, great businesses and I got to see all my remote friends that I only see once or twice a year. I know I speak for the rest of my team as well in saying that, and I’ll be eager to participate in GWT.Create next year. I’m already pledging that we will submit more sessions for the pleasure of the GWT community and our own open source community!

See ya next year!